Proofreading and editing aren’t from the same field! Even if many people use the terms in a more interchangeable manner, proofreading and editing are two different phases of the full revision process. Both demands thorough and close reading but they centralize on all other numerous elements of the writing and follow numerous procedures.

Familiarizing the Basics of Editing.

Editing is what you start doing as soon as you’re done with the first draft. For example, you reread your draft to examine whether the evidence supports your idea, the organization of paragraphs is smooth, and the paper is well-organized. In most cases, you can edit on a lot of different levels.

Content – Make Sure It Follows a Specific Guideline.

Have you followed the guidelines for your articles? Is the evidence accurate? If it’s asked to do so, does your paper present a strong argument? Is the argument supported? Are all of the claims consistent and well-organized? Have you supported each point with enough indication? Is all of the information in your article important? Does it match the overall aim of your writing? For additional tips, read the article from trusted sites.

Overall Organization – Ensuring Consistency Is Noticeable.

Does your article have the proper introduction and conclusion? Is your dissertation stated in your introduction? Is it clear how each paragraph and content is connected with your thesis paper? Are the paragraphs organized in a logical manner? One way to examine the sentence construction of your article is to make a reverse outline after you’re done with the draft.

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Transition Within Paragraphs.

Does each paragraph have a clear topic? Does paragraph follow the main idea? Are there any missing or improper sentences in your paragraphs? Read more information from trusted sites such as http://writingjudge.com/services/essaydune to expand your knowledge.

Accuracy – Why Your Paragraphs Should Be Clear.

Have you accurately explained the important terms that might appear unclear to readers? Is the meaning of each paragraph clear? One way to resolve these concerns is to read the full paragraph and sentence out loud, starting at the end and working backward so that you’ll not unconsciously fill in the content from the previous sentences. Is it clear what each noun and pronoun refers to? Have you decided on the proper words to present your ideas? Next, you’re advised to deter writing words you find in the thesaurus and dictionary that isn’t part of your average vocabulary, you can misuse them.

Find Your Own Style of Writing.

Have used the sufficient tone? Is your use of gendered language pronouns and words that some people ineffectively use for one gender? Have you learned the main difference of your sentence structure and writing style? Do you tend to make use of the passive voice? Does your writing contain a lot of unnecessary words and phrases? Do you repeatedly make use of strong words?

As you edit at all these phases, you’ll make changes to the sentence structure and main content of your article. Keep an eye out for patterns of error, especially if you’re revising an important document such as your thesis or dissertation.

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Proofreading and editing aren’t from the same field! Even if many people use the terms in a more interchangeable manner, proofreading and editing are two different phases of the full revision process. Both demands thorough and close reading but they centralize on all other numerous elements of the writing...